NetApp PowerShell Toolkit 101: Managing Data Access

Over the last several posts we have reviewed how to create and manage aggregates, SVMs, and volumes. All of that is great, but at this point you still can’t access that capacity to begin storing things. In this post we will discuss the various ways to access the volumes and the data inside them.

  • Junctioning
  • Export Policies
  • NFS Exports
  • CIFS/SMB Shares
  • LUNs
    • LUN Management
    • iGroups
    • LUN Mapping

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NetApp PowerShell Toolkit 101: Managing Volumes

Volumes are the containers of data in a NetApp storage system. They are “stored” on aggregates, accessed via Storage Virtual Machines, and are the point-of-application for many of the features of Data ONTAP. Let’s look at what we can do with volumes leveraging the PowerShell Toolkit:

  • Creating, Deleting, and Re-sizing Volumes
  • Volume Features
    • Thin Provisioning
    • Deduplication
    • Compression
    • AutoGrow / AutoShrink
    • Fractional Reserve
    • Quality of Service
  • Volume Options
  • Snapshots
  • FlexClones
  • Volume Move

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NetApp PowerShell Toolkit 101: Storage Virtual Machine Configuration

Storage Virtual Machines (SVM) are the entity in clustered Data ONTAP which the storage consumer actually interacts with. As the name implies, they are a virtual entity, however they are not a virtual machine like you would expect. There are no CPU, RAM, or other cache assignments that must be made. Instead, we assign storage resources to the SVM, such as aggregates and data LIF(s), which the SVM then uses to provision FlexVols and make them available via the desired protocol.

In this post we will look at how to configure an SVM using PowerShell.

  • Create an SVM
  • Aggregate Access
  • SVM DNS Service
  • Configuring Data LIF(s)
  • Configuring Protocols

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NetApp PowerShell Toolkit 101: Cluster Configuration

Using the NetApp PowerShell Toolkit (NPTK) can sometimes be a daunting task. Fortunately, it is pretty intuitive on how to configure most aspects of your storage system. Let’s start by looking at some of the cluster level configuration items that can be managed using the NTPK.

In this post we will cover:

  • AutoSupport
  • Licenses
  • Cluster Management LIF(s)
  • Inter-Cluster LIF(s)
  • SNMP
  • DNS

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NetApp PowerShell Toolkit 101: Getting Started

The NetApp PowerShell Toolkit (NPTK) is a great way to get started administering your NetApp resources, both 7-mode and clustered Data ONTAP (cDOT), in a more efficient and scalable manner.

Getting the Toolkit

The download (version 3.2 at the time of this writing) is available from the NetApp Communities in the Microsoft Cloud and Virtualization board.

From the download page are two links to some great resources: the Getting Started presentation, and Making the Most of the NetApp PowerShell Toolkit. Both of these are excellent reads if you want some starting hints.

Getting Help

  • The NetApp Communities: The communities are a great place to get help quickly for any question you might have. I recommend that you use the Microsoft Cloud and Virtualization Discussions board, however the SDK and API board will infrequently have questions as well.You can also send me a message using the NetApp Communities. My username is asulliva, and I’m happy to respond to questions directly through the Communities messaging system.
  • From the NPTK itself: One of the less known features of the Toolkit is that it has help built in. Yes, you can use the standard Get-Help cmdlet, but there’s a hidden treasure: Show-NcHelp.This cmdlet will generate an HTML version of the cmdlet help and open your default browser to display it.

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    From here you can dig through the cmdlets and view all of the information you want to know about them quickly and easily.

A Few Basics To Get Started

Now that you have the toolkit and have installed it, it’s time to use it. Let’s look at a couple of basic tasks.

Note: I will be using the cDOT cmdlets, however nearly all of the commands have an equivalent available for 7-mode.

Connecting to a controller
Connecting to your cluster is extremely easy. You can specify the cluster management IP address, or any of the node management IPs as well. If you do not provide credentials as a part of the command invocation, it will prompt for them.

Getting Information
Now that we’re connected to the cluster, let’s take a look at some of the information that can be gathered:

Onward to Automation

There are a number of “PowerShell Toolkit 101” posts that introduce some of the possibilities. Be sure to read through these other posts:

This doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of the NetApp PowerShell Toolkit. Anything that can be done from the command line can be done using the toolkit. If you’re interested in seeing specific examples, need help, or just have questions, please let me know in the comments!